Sociology- Part I

The Anti-Corruption Fund presents an analysis of a sociological survey of the trust in political and judicial institutions, dedicated to fighting corruption. The survey is contracted by the ACF to Alpha Research LTD sociological agency and conducted between 11-22 April 2017. The results are representative for the population of the country.
 
The survey results reveal strong negative trends in the public trust in institutions: the Public Prosecution Office is trusted by only 8,4%, the court – 7%, the police – 4,3%, National Security State Agency – 0,1%, ant the government – 0,9 %. It is noteworthy that more than half of the respondents decline to answer this question of public trust in institutions.
With respect to the question of the perception of the spread of corruption in public institutions, the results are also negative. According to the poll, the corruption is wide-spread in the following institutions: the court – 44%, the Public Prosecution Office – 35%, along with the parliament – 43,5%, ministries – 29,5%, the police – 31,6%, and municipalities – 26%.
The predominant public attitudes in relation to the existing anti-corruption policies and measures, support policies of increasing penal sanctions for committed corruption crimes (62%) and to the lesser degree  (38%) – policies and measures for preventing corruption. This result indicates the populist expectations for fighting corruption with increasing the sanctions, but not changing the way governmental systems function.
The high levels of distrust of institutions is indicative by the result that only 31% of the respondents are ready to submit signals for corruption. The police is indicated from 35% of the respondents as the institution to be addressed with signals against corruption, while the second trusted for addressing anti-corruption signals are the media – 34%. The Public Prosecution receives only 18%, while the administrative inspectorate with the institution, in which corruption has been reported receives only 13% public trust.    
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